Archive for August, 2009

DR. WHAW? Sunday Digest – Week-ending August 30, 2009

This was a tough week for the Sunday digest.  There was a TON of great news and insight that emerged this week, and it was really difficult to pick just seven articles to share with you as the best of the week.  After much hemming and hawing, here it is!  What I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work this week.

DR. WHAW? Sunday Digest – Week-ending August 30, 2009

1. Community and the Politics of Place by Chuck Hemann — This is a brilliant post about how social media may be able to restore the sense of community that was once prevalent in our society.  Chuck Hemann provides some great insights into this phenomenon and why social media may be just the trick to get us back.  What do you think?  I think this is definitely worth some serious consideration.  It’s always good to think about social media as something other than a great business or marketing tool.  : )

2. Relinquish Control, Empower the Passionate Fans! by Ryan Stephens — Everyone has been arguing lately that social media is not about controlling your brand.   What I haven’t seen much of is an explanation of how to give up control without completely losing touch, but Ryan Stephens gives a brilliant overview here.  The post is specifically about sports and how you can use the post of your 80,000+ fans, but there are some great lessons here that can be applied across any branding strategy.  This is a definite must-read if you’re into branding online at all or if you remain unconvinced of the potential power of social media.

3. Basics of Social Media ROI from @thebrandbuilder from Ken Burbary — If you are interested in social media measurement at all, heck if you’re interested in social media at all, you must read this! The full presentation from Olivier Blanchard about SM ROI is provided here, and it is brilliant.  Hopefully you’re all convinced by now that measurement is absolutely essential to any PR or marketing campaign, and this is the best resource I’ve seen for SM measurement thus far.  READ IT!

4. Can we all stop agreeing with each other and have some arguments please? by Edward Boches — Lately Edward Boches has noticed a trend in blog post comments and Twitter interactions that he doesn’t like: we’re all agreeing!  But why is that bad, you may ask?  Read on!  We may all be trying to be a little too nice, but at what cost?  I wonder if we’re not missing out on some great insight and discoveries because we’re all too concerned about doing the “right thing.”  I know I’m hesitant to disagree because I’m still a newbie.  What about you?

5. Twitter: protected by the First Amendment? by Mike Schaffer — The freedom of Tweet is not mentioned in the First Amendment, but Mike Schaffer believes that it is most certainly implied.  He argues that the Tweet falls somewhere between “speech” and “press” and should for that reason be protected.  This is definitely something you should think about and consider as Twitter evolves.  It could have some serious implications down the road.

6. Tribune Co. Offers Localized Network of 70+ Blogs to Advertisers from Marketing Vox — Earlier this month the Tribune Co. made some great financial strides and made us all believe there was hope yet.  With the creation of a blogger network throughout the city of Chicago, I think the Tribune is well on its way back into our hearts.  This shows that there can be hope for newspapers yet, but only if they innovate and find a way to carve out a new niche.

7. Mobile is glue for all we do by Dan Butcher — An ESPN executive stressed that mobile is a key component of their network’s overall portfolio.   This surprised me at first considering all of the media channels that the sports giant uses, but it does make sense.  It has been said that nearly 100 percent of all U.S. citizens will use a cell phone by the year 2013, and it seems smart to invest in this media channel now.  This is a very interesting read because it shows you how ESPN is integrating their mobile launches and programs with the rest of their network.   How should your business or industry be using mobile?

Did I pick the best ones?  Were there others you would have chosen instead?  Why?

Leave me your thoughts, I really want to understand which reads are your favorites or most important to you.

August 30, 2009 at 2:51 PM 1 comment

DR. WHAW? – August 28, 2009

Another move this weekend, though for once I’m not the one moving!  My little sister is leaving for college soon, and she’ll be the last little girl to leave the nest.  It’s an exciting time for our family, and we’re all learning how to navigate these waters.  In the meantime, I’m happy to bring you what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work on Friday!

DR. WHAW? – August 28, 2009

1. Social Media’s Top 10 Dirty Little Secrets by David Armano — This is a refreshing post that shows that social media is not all fun and games.  Social media isn’t perfect even though we often make it seem that way.  There are some downsides, too, like most SM is just plain bad marketing or public relations.  The increasingly fast development of technology can be detrimental and burnout does happen.  These are some good things to realize and accept before you commit yourself to a huge SM undertaking.

2. Social Media is from Mars, Enterprise 2.0 is from Venus by Gia Lyons — This is a cool analysis of the disconnect between social media and enterprise in the Web 2.0 space.  It is clear that a large part of the disconnect is because there is a language barrier that needs to rectified.  No matter what it is difficult for each to understand the other, but as social media evolves, it becomes harder and harder for these two groups to speak to each other easily.  This is something that I have not heard much about, but it is a problem that must be rectified.

3. Remember the Tortoise not the Hare by Jennifer Leggio — We all remember the story of the tortoise and the hare.  And we all remember the moral of that story?  Good!  Now apply it to social media.  Jennifer Leggio reminds us all to not be in such a rush to be the first, but instead we should all focus on producing the best content.  While it can seem  like a race, it’s important to remember your goals and keep those in mind.

4. Mobile is glue for all we do by Dan Butcher — An ESPN executive stressed that mobile is a key component of their network’s overall portfolio.   This surprised me at first considering all of the media channels that the sports giant uses, but it does make sense.  It has been said that nearly 100 percent of all U.S. citizens will use a cell phone by the year 2013, and it seems smart to invest in this media channel now.  This is a very interesting read because it shows you how ESPN is integrating their mobile launches and programs with the rest of their network.   How should your business or industry be using mobile?

5. Social Media Metrics: What We Need to Track Sales by Samir Balwani — With all of the talk about measuring social media and its effects, we have often lost track of what really matters: sales.  How has social media effected your sales?  Isn’t that the most important question?  Samir Balwani gives some great thoughts as to how social media can effect your sales and how to figure out which actions are, in fact, increasing your numbers.

6. Driven to Tweet, But Why? by Kathy Bloomgarden — I think it’s becoming more and more clear to all of us that some people are just driven to Tweet.  This article explains why that might be.  Why am I more driven to Tweet than most of my friends?  Why are more of my coworkers driven to Tweet but few of our supervisors are?  This is a great read because it explores the psychology behind one of the fastest growing social media sites: Twitter.  And it also helps us to better understand the minds of those we may be seeking to influence.

7. You Self-Serving Pig by Mitch Joel — This article explores the paradox surrounding the development of social media channels like Twitter and blogs.  It often seems to be all about me.  You Tweet about what’s important to you, you blog your own thoughts and we can all be very self-serving.  Mitch Joel wonders how we can build personal brands when all we really want is to find content that is valuable but not self-promotional.  It’s an interesting question that has generated some great conversation.  What do you think?  I’m inclined to believe that your personal brand can be built by provide consistently valuable content.

Here’s hoping you all had a great weekend and spent some time relaxing! I’m so excited with all the changes happening my life, my friend’s lives and my family’s lives, but boy!  I’m excited to be settled down, too!

August 30, 2009 at 2:36 PM Leave a comment

DR. WHAW? – August 27, 2009

Well, now I’m on a roll!  I posted yesterday’s DR. WHAW? very late, but now I’m in a groove.  So I’m gonna keep it going’ with what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work today!

DR. WHAW? – August 27, 2009

1. Being Helpful is the New Black by Valeria Maltoni — As social media is evolving, Valeria Maltoni has decided that it’s time for a little less conversation.  Action is demanded more these days as we better understand the conversation.  She has decided to take a new approach to her work and adopt a new brand.  What do you think?  Is this a good idea?  Does this make sense to you or do you think it’s a bad move?  Regardless, I think it’s a bold move, and I think she’s got it right!

2. A Few Good Things to Come Out of the Recession by Freddie Laker — This economy sucks, huh?  We’re all feelin’ it.  But Freddie Laker argues that there are five trends that have been accelerating and will actually be a good thing.  Can you guess which one is my favorite?  Meaningful metrics are emerging and becoming mainstream, which is amazing!  It’s about time.  I recommend this, but do take it with a grain of salt.  Check out the comments, too, and understand that these trends are emerging, but maybe not for everyone.

3. Ten Basic Steps To an Easy AND Effective Crisis Plan by Beth Harte — Even though it may seem like you need to have a huge binder dedicated to your crisis plan, Beth Harte offers ten simple steps toward building a great crisis plan that won’t take over your life.  I really liked this post because it doesn’t require that you focus upon Web 2.0 for this to be relevant to you (which I’m finding to be rare these days).  Do you really need more convincing to read this post?

4. How to Create a Share of Voice Report by Jason Baer — I’m sharing this with you because I think it’s worthwhile for all professionals to understand measurement and how to show your value through numbers.  A share of voice report can be an important tool for all public relations and marketing professionals, and this is a great starting point.  It teaches you the basics and need-to-knows without bombarding you with unnecessary jargon.

5. Tribune Co. Offers Localized Network of 70+ Blogs to Advertisers from Marketing Vox — Earlier this month the Tribune Co. made some great financial strides and made us all believe there was hope yet.  With the creation of a blogger network throughout the city of Chicago, I think the Tribune is well on its way back into our hearts.  This shows that there can be hope for newspapers yet, but only if they innovate and find a way to carve out a new niche.

6. The Leaders that are Helping Social Media Grow Up by Ken Burbary — If it feels like social media needs to grow up sometimes, it’s because it does.  Ken Burbary offers some great thought into how social media is beginning to grow, but still needs some key guidance.  Most importantly he insists that bring financial and business value to social media in order for companies to run with it.  Exactly!  There is no one person who can do this, but it’s a charge we must all take on.  Can you help?

7. Getting to Know the Mobile Population from eMarketer — This article provides a great run down of some key demographics that make up the mobile population.  Why do you care?  Nearly 100 percent of the U.S. will go mobile by 2013.  That’s HUGE.  What that means for you and your business is up to you to decide, but whether or not you’re ready, you need to start thinking mobile.  How can your product be used on or connect with a mobile platform?  We’re all going to be toting a cell phone sooner or later, so you should definitely start doing your research on us now.  This is a brilliant place to start.

Happy almost-Friday, y’all!  I hope your week has been fabulous thus far, and I can’t to hear about your weekend plans!

August 27, 2009 at 8:07 PM 1 comment

DR. WHAW? – August 26, 2009

Hello all, I must apologize for how late this blog post is.  I had planned to work on this first thing in the morning, but on my walk to work this morning I witnessed a mugging.  A boy not too much older than I was running barely ahead of me, and I must admit I’ve been a bit frazzled all day.  Though much delayed, there are still some great gems I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work yesterday.

DR. WHAW? – August 26, 2009

1. How to Build a Multilingual, Multicultural Customer Experience by Anand Subramniam — Remember that post I highlighted a little while back that insisted we’re all just talking about the same thing?  Here’s a post to prove that wrong!  I loved this post because it explores a part of social media I have not seen before, and it provides a lot of valuable insights.  Creating a more universal experience will quickly become necessary for large brands as well as those that wish to grow.  This is definitely a useful resource for all!

2. Social Media Excellence and a Side of Fries by Jason Baer — Apparently there’s just something about Mary, or so says Jason Baer.  So who is this Mary character?  She’s none other than a friendly McDonald’s employee who has developed a unique following due to her drive-thru prowess.  Why highlight Mary?  She’s different, she’s unique and she’s found a way to break through the day-to-day.  We can all learn from her, especially those of us who seek to “go viral” or create the next smash social media success.  There’s a lot to gain from being unique and exceeding expectations.  How can you incorporate lessons into your own work?

3. Can we all stop agreeing with each other and have some arguments please? by Edward Boches — Lately Edward Boches has noticed a trend in blog post comments and Twitter interactions that he doesn’t like: we’re all agreeing!  But why is that bad, you may ask?  Read on!  We may all be trying to be a little too nice, but at what cost?  I wonder if we’re not missing out on some great insight and discoveries because we’re all too concerned about doing the “right thing.”  I know I’m hesitant to disagree because I’m still a newbie.  What about you?

4. The Iceberg Effect of Community Management by Rachel Happe — I’ve been hearing more and more lately about these new-fangled professionals calling themselves “community managers.”  So what the heck is that all about?  This is a great resource for those who are thinking about community management or just want to learn a little more about it.

5. Twitter: protected by the First Amendment? by Mike Schaffer — The freedom of Tweet is not mentioned in the First Amendment, but Mike Schaffer believes that it is most certainly implied.  He argues that the Tweet falls somewhere between “speech” and “press” and should for that reason be protected.  This is definitely something you should think about and consider as Twitter evolves.  It could have some serious implications down the road.

6. The Cookie Cutter Expert. by Stuart Foster — I like this in part because it doesn’t agree with a lot of what has been written, but provides a deeper, more meaningful insight.  Stuart Foster agrees that using social media in a way that helps to show your skills and win yourself a job is fantastic.  He doesn’t, however, believe that this will automatically make you a social media expert.  Don’t kid yourself into believing that the use of a blog or Twitter stream to land that big gig has made you a guru.  I agree with him, and I think it’s a worthwhile read because it gives the honest truth.

7. When Social Media Attacks! by Dave Linabery — I love this graphic!  It’s adorable and it gives great information for those of us looking to use social media for marketing or public relations purposes.  Social media can be such a great addition to any program or campaign, but only if done well.  This graphic gives some common ways to find yourself at the end of a vicious social media attack in a hurry!  Consider yourself warned!

And now it is time for me to head out to view a couple apartments! Then back to sleep, and I promise I will have today’s DR. WHAW? up before you’re even at work tomorrow!  : )  Please leave comments or questions, and remember to send votes for the Sunday digest to my e-mail or Twitter.

August 27, 2009 at 4:55 PM Leave a comment

DR. WHAW? – August 25, 2009

Two down, three to go!  This week has flown by for me, I don’t know about you.  I’m taking on some exciting new projects at work, and I’m needing to find a new place to live.  No time for dilly-dallying!  So here’s what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work on Tuesday.

DR. WHAW? – August 25, 2009

1. Why is the reputation of the PR industry so bad? by Morgan McLintic — We are all painfully aware that the public relations industry gets a bad name very often, but do we understand why?  Morgan McLintic offers some explanations as to why the industry earns its bad reputation.  Luckily, the reasons given all seem to be those that we can remedy.  So what do you think?  Do these ideas really hit the heart of the problem, or is there more to it?  I think there are some good steps in here, but I do think that there will always be a fundamental bias towards PR.

2. Type of Rich Media and Their Effect on Brand Metrics from DynamicLogic.com — This is a simple and easy-to-understand post.  The chart provides types of rich media that can effect brand metrics.  It may seem like a no-brainer or a silly post to highlight, but I think that these numbers can help you in a significant way.  Do you know which media will help your brand the most?

3. Basics of Social Media ROI from @thebrandbuilder from Ken Burbary — If you are interested in social media measurement at all, heck if you’re interested in social media at all, you must read this! The full presentation from Olivier Blanchard about SM ROI is provided here, and it is brilliant.  Hopefully you’re all convinced by now that measurement is absolutely essential to any PR or marketing campaign, and this is the best resource I’ve seen for SM measurement thus far.  READ IT!

4. Anatomy of a social media product launch by Amy Mengel — So maybe  you use social media, but do you understand how to use it for marketing or advertising?  I really don’t fully get it, either.  I love this post by Amy Mengel because it gives an illustrated example of how social media can be used for more than just social interaction.  Think it’s not worth it?  Screenr was launched using internal and employee blogs and was covered by the New York Times within days of its launch!

5. Employees are Social Media Marketers, Too! by Gia Lyons –This is another presentation, but it’s worth clicking through.  All employees can be social media marketers, but you need to know how to help them!  Most employees are already using social media, so why not read this and learn how to make them work for you at the same time?

6. Is Media Multitasking the New A.D.D.? by Brian Solis –There is little doubt that our society is evolving and becoming more social.  How does this effect us really?  Brian Solis suggest that our use of multitasking is making us more, well, distracted!  A recent study by Stanford University also claims that this practice makes us attracted irrelevancy.  We make a conscious choice to be distracted from one task when we multitask, and I think we do need to slow down and think about how this is effecting our work quality.  What do you think?

7. Is Twitter Killing Blog Comments? by Danny Brown — As always, this is a thought-provoking post from Danny Brown.  Luckily, I think blog comments are safe as his post garnered 91 itself (at time of writing).  It is true that sometimes discussions about blogs evolve on Twitter, but personally I like to go straight to the source to ensure that the blogger is involved and to allow for all other readers to engage me in conversation.  There are some valid points, though, and I think this is worth our consideration.

Almost halfway to the weekend, folks!  How ya feeling?

August 26, 2009 at 10:07 AM Leave a comment

DR. WHAW? – August 24, 2009

How was everyone’s Monday?   I hope marvelous!  My weekend was great, and I was lucky enough to have some time for self-reflection.  Have you thought about who you are lately?

It’s a busy time for me right now, so I’ll get right down to business.  Here’s what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work on Monday!

DR. WHAW? – August 24, 2009

1. Relinquish Control, Empower the Passionate Fans! by Ryan Stephens — Everyone has been arguing lately that social media is not about controlling your brand.   What I haven’t seen much of is an explanation of how to give up control without completely losing touch, but Ryan Stephens gives a brilliant overview here.  The post is specifically about sports and how you can use the post of your 80,000+ fans, but there are some great lessons here that can be applied across any branding strategy.  This is a definite must-read if you’re into branding online at all or if you remain unconvinced of the potential power of social media.

2. Should Web 2.0 Be Held to Journalism Ethics? by Sean Williams — Journalists are held to pretty strict ethical standards, but what about the bloggers of the world?  While it’s easy to see there are some dramatic difference between traditional and online journalism, I think there is some merit to the question.  Should we as bloggers be held to journalistic ethics?  Should we create our of code?  What do you think?  Personally, I don’t see a reason for bloggers to be held to the same standards as journalists because, after all, our purposes are often far different.  But I do think it’s high time we consider creating our own set of ethics.

3. How To Track Your Twitter ROI by Jennifer Van Grove — I very much like and dislike this post at the same time.  On the one hand, this is a great and comprehensive list of some awesome tools you should be using to track Twitter conversations.  But on the other hand, these tools do not give your ROI all on their own.  It rather enrages me because it furthers the idea that measuring how many Tweets and RTs you have will give you a Twitter ROI.  But of what use is Tweet count?  Is that how we measure ROI in public relations? Nooo!  I very much dislike that this doesn’t explain that these are tools which could be used to find ROI, but perhaps I’m being too sensitive.

4. Astroturfing Online Reviews: 3 Reasons It’s A Bad Idea by Dave Fleet — It was recently discovered that a PR firm was using a team of interns to place phony positive reviews online, a practice known as astroturfing.  While this may seem like an easy way to get some good feedback out there, Dave Fleet gives three very convincing arguments against this practice.  Read this before you even consider posting false reviews online.

5. Mining the Web for Feelings, Not Facts by Alex Wright — Finally!  Some recognition!  Sentiment analysis is really coming into its own, so much so that the New York Times took notice.  This is a pretty good overview of what sentiment analysis is and how it’s helping companies already.  There was also coverage about how it’s really gaining ground this year, and this is all very good news for those of us who have been advocating for measurement all these years.  At the same time, I can’t help but feel like this is only half of the story.  I’m interested to see more detailed coverage and wide-spread acceptance of other measurements.

6. 1995 Was a Great  Year for Social Media by Keith Trivitt — In this post, Keith Trivitt explores online communities, which have been around for over 15 years.  He wonders why it is has taken this long for companies to get involved with these online gathering places.  This will really make you wonder, why did it us so long to get where we are?  Where could we be tomorrow?

7. Community and the Politics of Place by Chuck Hemann — This is a brilliant post about how social media may be able to restore the sense of community that was once prevalent in our society.  Chuck Hemann provides some great insights into this phenomenon and why social media may be just the trick to get us back.  What do you think?  I think this is definitely worth some serious consideration.  It’s always good to think about social media as something other than a great business or marketing tool.  : )

I hope the rest of your week goes well, y’all!  Make sure to let me know what you think, and tell me when I miss out on a big article.

August 25, 2009 at 10:06 AM 2 comments

Life is short, and so am I.

This past week I read a blog post which claimed that providing yourself with limitations will often lead to more success than trying to meet unrealistic goals.  It reminded me very much of my own philosophy of life, and I thought it fitting to share it with you.

“Life is short, and so am I.”

I don’t remember who first said it to me, where I read it or when I started believing it, but I can tell you that not a day goes by when I don’t think about this quote.  It fits my life in so many ways, including the fact that I come from a horizontally-challenged family (I’m the second tallest in my immediate family at a whopping 5’1’’).

I have an ego just like everyone else; I think that I rock at making new connections and went to the best darn basketball school in the world.  At the same time, I realize I have limitations and shortcomings; I’m clumsy as all get out and often get too focused on “having a plan” for my own good.

My life is guided by two simple truths:

1. My life is short. I need to make the most of every situation, take time to enjoy the world and the people in my life, always try my hardest, never be embarrassed and laugh at myself at least once a day.

2. I am short. I need to understand what I can and cannot do, respect my limitations,  never promise more than I can give, learn when to be selfish and realize that it’s OK to say “no.”

Admittedly, sometimes a day comes around when all I forget I can’t “do it all” or when I would just rather sleep in.  I grow every day, though, and more and more I embody this philosophy in all of my actions.

What is your philosophy of life?  How does it define you?

August 23, 2009 at 3:56 PM 1 comment

DR. WHAW? Sunday Digest – Week-ending August 23, 2009

I bring you this week’s digest from the  pool deck at my parent’s house.  I was in desperate need of a relaxing weekend away, and this was the perfect mini-vacation.  From a much more relaxed and grounded state of mind, I give you the tops picks from DR. WHAW? this week.

DR. WHAW? Sunday Digest – Week-ending August 23, 2009

1. An In-Depth Look Inside the Twitter World by Alex Cheng and Mark Evans — Do you use Twitter?  Have you thought about it?  This is a valuable resource which provides just about every statistic and factoid about Twitter you could ever imagine.  There are some great insights here, and I challenge you to read through and find your answer to this question: so what?  California and New York have the most Twitter users of any state, what does that mean to you as a marketer, a student, a job seeker?  There is great value here!

2. Brands must adapt to “new normal” from WARC — While this article is referring to retailers and how they need to adapt to consumer’s changing habits, I think that we can all learn a lesson or two here.  The economy and the boom of social media has changed a lot of industries for good, and they all need to adapt (and fast).  Wal-Mart is one store that is actually doing well despite the downturn, in part because they have what consumers want and they fit the new spending pattern.  How has the economy changed your industry?  Has your business adapted?  It should!

3. Think, Cultivate, Be There for Other in Social Media by Keith Trivitt — I love this post!  I love social media because it opens your world to a whole community of people who can offer insight and value.  Keith Trivitt explains that we all need to be willing to give back more to be truly involved in social media.  He gives a very persuasive argument, and I think anyone involved in social media should read this.  Be sure to check out the comments, too because there is some more valuable insight there.

4. Young People Don’t Tweet, Young Professional Do by Charlotte Barker — I could not say this any better than the title.  While this post is focused upon the recent 30 Under 30 Tweeters distinction, I think there is much more to learn from this idea.  It’s true that teens are not on Twitter because they don’t see it as something they can use.  Young and budding professionals, however, can gain a lot of value from Twitter and should be utilizing it as much as possible.  The #u30pro chat is a perfect example of a resource every young pro should be using.  This chat is a great way for those over 30 to bridge the gap with those under 30.  We can all learn from each other!

5. The Bridge Between “Evolve” or “Die” by Amber Naslund — Is it really so harsh a world that we must choose between evolve or die?  Amber Naslund says yes, it is, but you don’t have to do it alone.  Regardless of how you evolve or how you choose to move forward, it is necessary for us all to accept that (in business and life) change is often needed.  This post suggests the best way to evolve is to collaborate with others who understand change is needed and to act on discussions and debates.  I think this is great advice for all of us, especially now in what seems to be a time of great change.  How will you evolve?

6. Has Generation Y developed social networking into a Social Media Revolution? by Sean Easley — I chose this post because it’s thought-provoking.  I agree and disagree with it at the same time.  Some still believe social networks are a fad, but this video explains how Gen Y has been using them to create a so-called Social Media Revolution.  I agree that something big is happening, but is it a revolution?  And are we (Gen Y) really responsible?  You know we’d love the credit, but c’mon! There are a ton of Boomers out there using social networks for (what I’d call) revolutionary purposes, too!

7. 10 ways PR and marketing are every bit as powerful as trusted peers by Shel Holtz — There has been a lot of talk lately about how trusted peers (friends, family, classmates, etc.) are far more trusted than slimy PR and marketing folks.  Before you roll your eyes and say, “DUH!” read this post by Shel Holtz.  If you are in PR or marketing and are still following the tactics of yesteryear, then guess what?  You will not be trusted or taken seriously by most consumers.  But if you read this post and truly understand the idea of bringing PR/marketing into this millennium, then you stand a solid chance of competing with trust peers.

As always, I’d love to hear from you!  I know there are readers out there somewhere (my blog stats tell me so), and I’d love to get your feedback! Please leave comments or questions, and feel free to send them to my e-mail or Twitter.

August 23, 2009 at 2:32 PM 1 comment

DR. WHAW? – August 21, 2009

Happy weekend, y’all!  It’s been one of those days for me, but this in a good way!  It was a thrilling way to end my week, and I’m excited to get to relaxin’ so here’s what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work today!

DR. WHAW? – August 21, 2009

1. The Dark Side of Usability: When Business Goals & User Goals Collide by Lance Loveday — It’s important to understand what can happen when you lead customers to your Web site (or blog or Twitter page) without following through on promises, you will lost trust.  This post gives a great example of what this might look like, and it gives you tips on how to make sure you avoid this.  Be sure that you follow through on promises to ensure that you keep your loyal consumers and possibly gain new ones!

2. How To Become A Master Of Conversations by Nick O’Neill — Have you ever wanted to know how to get more involved with conversations online?  Do you want more engaged conversation with your blog readers or fans of your Facebook page?  This is a great one-stop post to read if you want to learn how to encourage more engaged conversation on your social media networks.

3. Twitter to roll out commercial accounts  this year by Kim-Mai Cutler and Matt Marshall — Did you hear the big news today?  Twitter will launch commercial accounts later this year.  The company will begin to charge users for services like advance analytics and official recognition.  What services will you be willing to pay for?  How would you use a commercial account as opposed to a regular one?

4. GM Appointment Shows No Respect for Marketing by Al Ries — GM appointed Bob Lutz as the new head of advertising and marketing.  His responsibilities will include brands, marketing, advertising and communications.  As  a man who has no experience in marketing, this is a complete slap in the face to the industry.  The conclusion of this article is that the industry has indeed sunk so low that this is allowed for a company in dire need of good marketing.  My question is this: how do we make our way out?  How do we prove that marketing is worthwhile?

5. Measuring Consumer Engagement from Engage This! — This post asks how to get to a point where measuring consumer engagement is possible.  Many companies are not quite ready to effectively measure engagement, but it is possible.  Before it can be measured, though, marketers must understand what the consumer spheres are like and how their brand fare at various levels of customer groups.  It is important to understand a lot about more about social media use by your users before you can fully measure engagement.  This is a worthwhile read because this is definitely something that will need to be measured in the coming years.

6. The Social Media Rules Are A-Changin’ by Ronn Torossian — Ronn Torossian argues that in the current social media environment, it is impossible for CEOs to fully engage their customers.  Mr. Torossian argues that he has a hard time interacting with all of his employees, let alone any consumer who has a question or comment.  If we expect CEOs to become more involved, we have to let the rules of social media change.  It is unreasonable to expect CEOs to follow rules laid out by users.  What do you think?  Do you agree with this?  Read the comments, too, because there’s plenty of good discussion there as well.

7. The big lure of social media: Its users by Diego Vasquez — What’s all the fuss about social media?  The users, of course!  And do you wonder why?  It’s because we’re young and affluent and active consumers, according to this post.  This is a great run down of some of the characteristics of social media users that are relevant to corporations, and it explains how these characteristics can be used to help companies.  Does this sound like you?  Is this post missing a key take-away?

And that’s all for me for the week, folks!  I’m excited for some relaxation and decompression this weekend.  What are your weekend plans?

August 21, 2009 at 6:49 PM Leave a comment

DR. WHAW? – August 20, 2009

What a week it has been, eh?  It’s almost Friday (thank goodness!), and today there will be no dilly-dallying!  Here’s what I Didn’t Read While Hard At Work!

DR. WHAW? – August 20, 2009

1. The Bridge Between “Evolve” or “Die” by Amber Naslund — Is it really so harsh a world that we must choose between evolve or die?  Amber Naslund says yes, it is, but you don’t have to do it alone.  Regardless of how you evolve or how you choose to move forward, it is necessary for us all to accept that (in business and life) change is often needed.  This post suggests the best way to evolve is to collaborate with others who understand change is needed and to act on discussions and debates.  I think this is great advice for all of us, especially now in what seems to be a time of great change.  How will you evolve?

2. Limiting Yourself: The Key to Your Success from Illuminated Mind — I love this post!  I love it so much, in fact, that I will soon be writing a post myself explaining my philosophy of life, which is similar.  While we all think of limitations as these terrible things that keep us from reaching our full potential, it is important to realize that some limitations can actually be the reason for our success.  You cannot do everything, and by realizing what you can and cannot do, you can be more successful.  Make sense?  Not completely?  Read up!

3. Has Generation Y developed social networking into a Social Media Revolution? by Sean Easley — I chose this post because it’s thought-provoking.  I agree and disagree with it at the same time.  Some still believe social networks are a fad, but this video explains how Gen Y has been using them to create a so-called Social Media Revolution.  I agree that something big is happening, but is it a revolution?  And are we (Gen Y) really responsible?  You know we’d love the credit, but c’mon! There are a ton of Boomers out there using social networks for (what I’d call) revolutionary purposes, too!

4. How ‘Shareable’ Is Your Social Media Content? by Mack Collier — If you know anything about using social media for business and marketing, you know that sharing content is a BIG DEAL.  So how best to ensure your content gets shared?  Make it shareable!  How to do that may seem simple, but Mack Collier gives a great explanation here about why it’s probably less obvious than you might think.

5. Is There Value in Discussion That Stops There? by Noah Brier — I will admit that I had to read this post twice before I fully understood, but I think it’s definitely worth a read (or two : )) by those of us involved in social media.  Noah Brier ponders where there is value to a discussion that ends without action.  If your consumers talk all day on their blog or Twitter about your brand, if no action comes of it, is that valuable to you?  Does discussion for the sake of conversation have real business value?  Am I missing the point?  Share your thoughts.

6. Social Media Saturation Yes, Maturation No. by Marc Meyer — Do you notice that sometimes blog posts seem to remind you of something?  Maybe it was that blog post you read last week from a different author.  Marc Meyer claims that we’ve reached social media saturation: there’s nothing new being written about social media.  But has it matured?  Not even close!  We’re encouraged to stop thinking about what social media is (we get it!) but think more about what it can do and how.

7. Can you out-source authenticity? by Mark W. Schaefer — This is a great post because I think it addresses a relevant dilemma with a personal anecdote and because the comments provide an incredibly valuable discussions.  Mark W. Schaefer asks if ghostwriting for a CEO is a good idea or not.  It brings up the question of whether ghostwriting at all is acceptable for public relations or marketing folks.  What do you think?  I strongly encourage you to weigh in, or at the very least check out the already-great conversation.

And with that, I wish you a happy Friday!  Please leave comments or questions, and remember to send votes for the Sunday digest to my e-mail or Twitter.

August 21, 2009 at 5:26 AM 2 comments

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